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TD's Daily Ti thread

Post by td99 » Fri Nov 20, 2009 9:24 pm

Rear wheel bearing change escalates to rear end restoration
It seems that rear wheel bearings can die of old age rather than miles.
So a couple of weeks ago, I started disassembling everything. It meant the family was one car short which was a bit awkward. It seemed to me the best way was to remove the rear wings to get better access to all the bits I had to replace. Of course I've heard the stories of the fuel tank rusting through and knew mine was rusting as well.
The further I got the more “disassembly fever” took over!
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The rear brake cylinders were f**ked. Even though the braking effort of the handbrake was perfect, the photo shows a serious mess!
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Rusting of the trailing arms had been an item of concern for me for the past couple of years but I had not had the opportunity/enthusiasm to remove and refurbish them until now.
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Amazing that the original label was still on the drive shaft
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I was still running the original shock absorbers, which actually seem to be performing okay, but a set of Avo’s has been laying in the cupboard waiting to be used for the last nine months.

I had a Quaife LSD on the shelf for last six months.

I've wanted to move the battery to the boot for quite some time but never got around to it.

So, what have I managed to do so far?

Extracted the rear wheel bearings and replaced with new ones.
If you are doing this, take care to support the inner bearing when pressing the wheel hub back into the bearing housing. I did not do this and saw that the oil seals were pushed out on the inside. Nothing I can do about that, it just means the bearings will have a slightly shorter lifetime I guess.

Exhaust mountings: I hate those b*******s. It's always an awful fight to get the rubber exhaust supports on and off of the mounting lugs and in the past nine months I've had to remove them couple of times for various reasons. So I decided to make some mountings which would allow me to simply pull a bolt out and let the mounting drop rather than try and pull the rubber on and off of those difficult lips.

Rear exhaust support:
A piece of galvanized bracket material cut and bent to make two supporting brackets which I bolted to the chassis such that the rubber exhaust mount fitted between the two brackets. One of the brackets has a stainless steel nut welded to it, the other has a hole to allow a bolt to be inserted. I used a length of steel piping (central heating piping) to be used as an insert through the rubber support enabling the bolt to be tightened without crushing the rubber.
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Intermediate exhaust support (by trailing arm):
This took some courage to chop off and weld a nut in the correct position. The nut had previously been drilled out such that it was a good fit without a thread for the bolt which would go through it. Again the same solution with a piece of central heating pipe to take up the pressure on the bolt and support the rubber mounting.
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Battery relocation:
Routed a length of 35 mm² copper cable from the engine compartment through the bulkhead along the side of the transmission tunnel inside the cockpit ,and then through the rear of the glassfibre. This is the shortest route and to my way of thinking, the safest route. Actually I think it's also the easiest is as easy to feed the thick cable underneath the carpet from front to rear. Where the cable bends around the differential housing, I protected it with a length of under-floor heating polyurethane tubing, extremely tough stuff. There’s also a loop of extra 20 cm in the rear of the cockpit allow for connection of isolation switch if ever required. Black cable was half te price of red, so I’ll put some red heat-shrink sleeve on the end for identification.
Still got to modify the boot…

Battery earth:
Cleaned the chassis to bare metal and fixed a strip of copper bar with two bolts and then soldered the two together- visually a good connection between copper and chassis with the solder.
For the battery earth connection, I inserted the earth wire into a short length of copper tubing and crushed this in the vice, followed by soldering it as well.
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I clamped this in position on the Earth strip and then soldered the whole thing together again. Finally, for belt and braces and whatever follows that, I drilled a hole through the crushed copper pipe, the copper strip and the chassis and put a 6 mm bolt through them. If that doesn't count for a good earth I don't know what does. The two protruding 8 mm bolts are available for other earth connections.
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When it came to replacing the petrol tank, the sight of this gave me a couple of heart-stopping moments, but with a bit of wiggling and a push it was not a problem!

Having done all that I realize it would have been much simpler to use a longer length of copper tubing crushed on the wire and solder/bolt that directly to the chassis! Less work and neater too.


Trailing arms:
These were still in pretty reasonable condition but had surface rust. After sandblasting I reinforced them on the inside ( welding not beautiful – I still have to get practice with new TIG welder) and decided this was enough (bit of chicken effect here).

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I treated them with metal ready and then POR15 black, followed by a protective silver coating. Once mounted, these will also be treated with a wax coating.
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Subsequently decided to get a bit more welding practice, grind away the POR15 and strengthen them more. Meant a day or so delay, but also peace of mind.
Cut out 4 plates with plasma cutter from builders merchants brackets (2.5 mm thick) to cover the single-thickness part of the trailing arm
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Welded the plates in position to give extra thickness all-round. Filled holes in brackets to seal.
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Rear brakes:
Cylinders replaced with new 22 mm versions (standard Ford replacement part in stock at accessory/parts shop and cheap too!) for increased braking effort to match the uprated front brakes. Flexible pipes replaced with stainless steel braided pipes (ridiculously expensive!). The back plates were cleaned up and coated with POR15.
Old and new cylinders:
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Petrol tank:
It seems that the petrol tanks rust where the end plates are welded in position. Although there was considerable rust along the length of these welds, particularly at the bottom, I think the tank is still okay. Cleaned up all these welds and any other rusty spots, coated the tank in POR15 and trust that it will last another 10 or 15 years. Notably, when I drained the tank, only clean petrol came out: no gunge or debris as has been reported elsewhere, apart from a rubber seal.
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Anybody know what this is?
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Looks like it could fit the petrol cap.

Differential:
obviously with the petrol tank removed this was a much easier job, I found that it was possible to remove the differential from the carrier frame without having to touch the very difficult to access front mounting point.
Remove the two rear cradle mounting bolts and let it sag about 10 cm.
Then just remove the two bolts at the front, the long centre bolt and the two at the rear, (supporting diff with jack etc.).

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You can do this without removing the petrol tank.

I found a local specialist to fit the lsd to the diff. Not cheap though.

Rear armature:

Mostly in good condition but certainly rusting in the rear outer supports, one of which has been damaged. Here, I ground the rust off as much as possible, used metal ready to inhibit rusting and coated again in POR15. After that I used up a spare can of paint to give an extra layer of protection
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Chassis provides an ideal hanging rack for components being treated. Trailing arms, the brake back plates and diverse mounting brackets having been cleaned up and now coated with POR15.

Rear Chassis:
Galvanization is clearly being eaten away. Given a generous coating of zinc spray,
Image
To be followed by water-repellent wax coating.
Last edited by td99 on Sun Feb 03, 2019 6:18 pm, edited 22 times in total.


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Post by scimjim » Fri Nov 20, 2009 9:36 pm

excellent thread and pics Trevor. I particularly like the exhaust mounts.

I fitted my battery cut off to the negative lead myself - the rear of those cut off switches are exposed to anything and I prefer exposed earths. it does require extra leads though unless you want the switch in the boot!

Apart from the surface corrosion on the trailing arms, springs, driveshafts, etc the rest looks pretty good under there?


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Post by td99 » Fri Nov 20, 2009 10:02 pm

Apart from the surface corrosion on the trailing arms, springs, driveshafts, etc the rest looks pretty good under there?
Well, it had a pretty protected youth - 13000 miles in 18 years and I think my Mum didn't like going shopping in the rain! Always garaged.

Actually, this is a nice story:
Mum paged through Birmingham motor show catalogue one Sunday and saw SS1 - needed to replace 20-year old Capri Gt. That sunday she viewed car through window of local dealer. Rang on Monday to order SS1 1600. Dealer could not deliver 1600 but offered Ti at massive discount.
On the day she was to collect the car, it was heavy rain so she rang garage to put it off. Result: Ti was delivered to her (at age of 65!) without her ever having touched it! Quote from her: "rarely use 5th gear"! (lived in small vilage in East sussex where roads are small and twisty - hence some minor scratches etc)


The underneath of the A-posts are rusty though - next item on agenda.
When this is winter-proof I can make a start re-assembling the DET project I bought from Paul Turnbull...that's when the fun really begins!


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Post by CNHSS1 » Fri Nov 20, 2009 10:09 pm

superb Trevor 8)


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Post by scimjim » Fri Nov 20, 2009 10:25 pm

do you mean the A posts, or the quarterlight frames?


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SECURE DRY STORAGE FOR YOUR SCIMITAR

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Post by td99 » Fri Nov 20, 2009 10:36 pm

do you mean the A posts, or the quarterlight frames?
Maybe better terminology is the front jacking points
see photo - I had already put in a plastic protector for chassis cross-member
The picture is deceiving - there is rust undeneath that zinc coating!

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Post by scimjim » Fri Nov 20, 2009 10:56 pm

that's quite unusual - is it the same on both sides?
I have seen rust on galv chassis but normally where something has rubbed it a lot - the bodytub footwells on both galv chassis I've stripped were both showing early signs and I believe Phils replacement chassis had some poor coverage in parts.


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SECURE DRY STORAGE FOR YOUR SCIMITAR

Current: SE5 (8Ball), TI SS1 (snotty), 1600 SS1 (G97), 1600 SS1 (C686CCR), 2.5TD SE5a (diesel 5a), 6 x random other SS1s.
Previous: SE5, 3 x SE5a, 2 x SE6a, 3 x SE6b, GTC, 2.9i GTC, 3 x 1600 SS1, 1300 SS1, Mk1 Ti Sabre, Mk1.5 CVH Sabre
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Post by td99 » Fri Nov 20, 2009 11:02 pm

Same on both sides Jim. It could be the effect of grit+salt from last winter.


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Post by kennatt » Sat Nov 21, 2009 8:39 am

td 99 as far as I am aware,welding of suspension arms is not permitted under the mot rules,so you may need to show your mot man the arms and get him to agree or otherwise before fitting,Had exactly this problem with the front arms on my vw camper,he passed it but said that it was only because it was a small area and he knows that new arms were unabtainable, just may save you agravation at mot time , nice post by the way ,Cheers



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Post by scimjim » Sat Nov 21, 2009 9:09 am

hmm - I've never heard that before? and of course - Reliant welded the damper mount extension onto the chevette wishbone in the first place.

Repairs to corrosion though, are allowed AFAIK. This part of the test concerns corrosion in general and you'd only fail for "inadequate repair in a prescribed area": http://www.ukmot.com/appendixC.asp#Text_top

and I don't think Trevor has an MoT - it's stricter!


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SECURE DRY STORAGE FOR YOUR SCIMITAR

Current: SE5 (8Ball), TI SS1 (snotty), 1600 SS1 (G97), 1600 SS1 (C686CCR), 2.5TD SE5a (diesel 5a), 6 x random other SS1s.
Previous: SE5, 3 x SE5a, 2 x SE6a, 3 x SE6b, GTC, 2.9i GTC, 3 x 1600 SS1, 1300 SS1, Mk1 Ti Sabre, Mk1.5 CVH Sabre
Chief mechanic for: 1400 K series SS1 (Megan3), 1400 CVH EFi SS1 (Grawpy), 1300 SS1 (Number One) & Sarah's coupe.
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Post by philhoward » Sat Nov 21, 2009 9:41 am

I think suspension arm welding might be frowned upon it is were a cast metal component, but its all mild steel on an SS1.

Galvanising is, at the end of the day, a protectant - just like paint. It just happens to last a lot longer than paint and gets where you can't see! Treat the rust patches as you would normally, then apply your favourite protectant. POR15 seems to get pretty good reviews from those who've tried it on here, but a good zinc-rich paint would probably do as well.

At this rate, you'll be getting carried away, Trevor - littlechickens 1800Ti started as an engine swap and turned into a near full restoration! If it needs just a few weeks work every 20 years though - thats not bad going.. Keep up the good work!


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Post by erikscimitardemon » Sat Nov 21, 2009 11:49 am

td99 / Trevor does not need MOT, he needs APK. Just like (almost) all other Dutch registered cars.
Dutch regulations are more strict on welding suspension bits.
No welding allowed on any moving (suspension) parts. But it is allowed to replace parts.
How you did the replacement parts is where its get vague. As in: if the cut out where the original weld is, and weld a new part back, no one will see the difference. Do repaint the whole part though! (see hint below).
A nice hint for Dutch APK:
If you car needs any welding - do it before taking it for a test. The tester is not allowed to remove any paint etc for inspection. But if a tester notices a rotten spot you must have a retest without any paint etc. Now the tester is allowed to check the actual weld.


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Post by Roger Pennington » Sat Nov 21, 2009 12:18 pm

philhoward wrote:Galvanising is, at the end of the day, a protectant - just like paint.
Not actually wrong, but it doesn't tell the whole story. Paint is simply a coating, which protects by isolating the metal from the weather. If paint is breached, then the weather gets in and corrosion starts.
Galvanising, as well as being a coating, also has an electrolytic effect which means that even if breached, the surrounding coating continues to provide some protection to the exposed area - the electrolytic effect means that the coating is eaten away rather than the base metal (i.e. it sacrifices itself). This is an active effect, rather than the purely passive effect of paint.
Metal objects immersed in seawater (eg ships) have attached lumps of zinc to act as a sacrificial anode and provide corrosion protection in the same way.
See Sacrificial anode

Obviously nothing in life is 100% effective, but that's why galvanising is better than just plain paint.

cheers,

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Post by philhoward » Sat Nov 21, 2009 12:31 pm

Poor choice or words on my part, Roger - sorry! Sacrificial is the right wording indeed. It also sticks better than paint..assuming its applied correctly!


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Post by td99 » Sat Nov 21, 2009 6:04 pm

Eric, thanks for the info re APK, was not aware of that. It's all painted nicely but looks a bit rough - maybe a thick coating of bitumen is a solution, then nobody can see the welding. Talk to you tomorrow about it!


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