Franko's '78 6a

If you have a long-term project and would like to share/document progress, this is for you.

Moderators: scimjim, Lukeyboy46, Roger Pennington, philhoward, erikscimitardemon

User avatar
franko14
Posts: 726
Joined: Sun Aug 16, 2009 1:14 pm
Location: Scotland/Brazil
Been thanked: 2 times

Franko's '78 6a

Post by franko14 » Wed Sep 16, 2009 7:28 pm

thought i'd start a project thread so you lot can laugh at my lack of skill in the mechanicals dept.

so... here we go.

when i bought her...

Image

after some poking around i have come to the conclusion the someone has spent some time and money on this old girl in the past.

the chassis was pretty good but there were a few areas that needed attention

Image

worst bit i spotted was this (see below)
Image

after some poking with a screwdriver..
Image

and how it stands tonight.. (had to stop after i put the grinder through the power cable :oops:
Image

have to add that the scimitar is probably the easiest car i've ever worked on... plenty of space to manouver... the exhaust was a doddle to take off... bolts came off first turn.. magic.. :D

Jobs already done...
coolant system flushed (?faulty thermostat)
all nipples greased
1/3 of chassis rubbed down.. got a stack of dinitrol in the post today.
ordered new top ball joint
cleaned interior
cleaned exterior

jobs yet to be done (excluding those i don't know about yet!! :shock: )
fit new thermostat
finish welding chassis
finish cleaning and rustproofing chassis
investigate the now defunct electrics... no indicators, no temp gauge, no volts gauge, no fuel gauge (i'll worry about that later :roll: )
and probably loads more things... happy days
Last edited by franko14 on Tue Oct 12, 2010 1:19 am, edited 1 time in total.


cheers,
Frank

Se6a GTE Auto 3702
'88 Saab 900 Turbo S

User avatar
philhoward
RSSOC Member
Posts: 25273
Joined: Tue Aug 29, 2006 5:41 pm
Location: Staffs, UK
Has thanked: 64 times
Been thanked: 632 times
Contact:

Post by philhoward » Wed Sep 16, 2009 7:36 pm

The gauge/indicator issues do have a common point - the fusebox! One thing about the Scimitar fusebox to note - on some fuses, each side of the fuse clip carries different wires. These clips can get a bit slack with age (assuming the fuse hasn't blown) and not make a sufficient contact to work properly.

Seeing the proximity of the green wires (to overdrive and reverse light switch) in the photo to your grinding, you haven't "caught" them as well as your power cable, have you?


Phil Howard
Scimitarweb Forum Admin
SS1 1600 Rooster Turbo; Sabre Mk1.5, Sabre Mk2
Previous: SE5/5a/SS1 No.1/SS1 Rooster/SS1 1800Ti/SE5a 24 Valve
http://www.ss1turbo.com
Never try and argue with an idiot. They drag you down to their level, then beat you based on experience.

User avatar
franko14
Posts: 726
Joined: Sun Aug 16, 2009 1:14 pm
Location: Scotland/Brazil
Been thanked: 2 times

Post by franko14 » Wed Sep 16, 2009 7:42 pm

haha .... nah i had the engine and all the ancilliaries covered with fire retardant overalls.... it was the grinders own cable i went through... steamy goggles and being in to much of a rush are my excuses.... well actually it did give me an excuse to go out and buy the other grinder i've been coveting for a while now :wink:


cheers,
Frank

Se6a GTE Auto 3702
'88 Saab 900 Turbo S

User avatar
philhoward
RSSOC Member
Posts: 25273
Joined: Tue Aug 29, 2006 5:41 pm
Location: Staffs, UK
Has thanked: 64 times
Been thanked: 632 times
Contact:

Post by philhoward » Wed Sep 16, 2009 7:46 pm

At least the grinder attack has shown the rot to be only that which showed itself with the screwdriver test.


Phil Howard
Scimitarweb Forum Admin
SS1 1600 Rooster Turbo; Sabre Mk1.5, Sabre Mk2
Previous: SE5/5a/SS1 No.1/SS1 Rooster/SS1 1800Ti/SE5a 24 Valve
http://www.ss1turbo.com
Never try and argue with an idiot. They drag you down to their level, then beat you based on experience.

User avatar
franko14
Posts: 726
Joined: Sun Aug 16, 2009 1:14 pm
Location: Scotland/Brazil
Been thanked: 2 times

Post by franko14 » Wed Sep 16, 2009 7:50 pm

philhoward wrote:At least the grinder attack has shown the rot to be only that which showed itself with the screwdriver test.
ye.. the chassis is in remarkable condition.. just that area and a few areas of surface rust... credit to her former owners i think. still going to give her some dollops of rustproofing for peace of mind in the future.


cheers,
Frank

Se6a GTE Auto 3702
'88 Saab 900 Turbo S

User avatar
guardsbrigade
Posts: 627
Joined: Tue Feb 03, 2009 10:21 am
Location: South Glos
Been thanked: 1 time

Post by guardsbrigade » Thu Sep 17, 2009 11:27 am

Looking good Frank!.
As Phil says the fusebox can be very problematic on these.I ended replacing it on my ex car with a modern blade one.Not a difficult job but time consuming and one for long summer days really!.

The contacts on my old box were shot and the extra resistance caused by the poor connections created a lot of heat and was beginning to melt the thing.


Cheers Dave

79 6a man o/d (going soon,maybe another to follow!)
97 Impreza 2.0 Sport AWD
00 Tigra 1.6

User avatar
franko14
Posts: 726
Joined: Sun Aug 16, 2009 1:14 pm
Location: Scotland/Brazil
Been thanked: 2 times

Post by franko14 » Thu Sep 17, 2009 1:32 pm

thanks dave... i'll add that to my list of jobs


cheers,
Frank

Se6a GTE Auto 3702
'88 Saab 900 Turbo S

User avatar
guardsbrigade
Posts: 627
Joined: Tue Feb 03, 2009 10:21 am
Location: South Glos
Been thanked: 1 time

Post by guardsbrigade » Thu Sep 17, 2009 6:00 pm

:D I started with a list of 30 jobs which grew to about 60!

Only thing to remember when changing to blade fuses is the blow points are different to the glass ones.You can roughly half it,I.E replace a 30 amp glass with 15 amp blade.The blades are rated at continuous current and the glass at blow point.


Cheers Dave

79 6a man o/d (going soon,maybe another to follow!)
97 Impreza 2.0 Sport AWD
00 Tigra 1.6

User avatar
franko14
Posts: 726
Joined: Sun Aug 16, 2009 1:14 pm
Location: Scotland/Brazil
Been thanked: 2 times

Post by franko14 » Sun Sep 20, 2009 5:36 pm

wee update...

finished cutting rotten bits of chassis, fabricated some new metal, welded new bits in, and given area an initial coating of dinitrol 3125, (underbody coating of 4941 yet to do)

Image

Image

that was my first ever chassis repair.. and my first serious bit of welding.
took a lot of practicing on scrap metal to get good penetration.
i left a drain hole at the bottom.


cheers,
Frank

Se6a GTE Auto 3702
'88 Saab 900 Turbo S

User avatar
MickP
Posts: 1035
Joined: Sat Jul 04, 2009 3:32 pm
Location: Montrose
Has thanked: 1 time
Been thanked: 10 times

Post by MickP » Sun Sep 20, 2009 8:21 pm

Looks like a neat bit of welding Frank - Hope you don't need to do much more! Engine and starter look pretty clean too from waht I can see - (unlike mine).

Michael.


SOLD: 1978 SE6a Auto.
1997 Ducati 900SS - Last carb. model.
SOLD: 1960 BSA Bantam D7 - more "fun" than the Ducati.
1998 Honda CG125 - great in slow traffic.
1981 Suzuki SB200 2-stroke twin - undergoing rebuild.
Gallery Project
“Technological progress has merely provided us with more efficient means for going backwards.” - Aldous Huxley.

User avatar
franko14
Posts: 726
Joined: Sun Aug 16, 2009 1:14 pm
Location: Scotland/Brazil
Been thanked: 2 times

Post by franko14 » Sun Oct 18, 2009 5:18 pm

its funny how the wee jobs sometimes give you the most satisfaction.
after doing loads of work, like cleaning up earth points, doing top ball joints bilaterally, fitting new exhaust gaskets etc... it has been a quick refurbishment of the headlight surround trim which has given me the most satisfaction. probably because it's a good visual transformation without too much effort.

forgot to take pictures of the other work i've done, but heres a few of the trim refurb.

before...
Image

Image

Image

after loads of sanding I discovered that a knike was the perfect tool for scraping of the old paint...
Image
Image

then i sprayed with 3 coats of plastic primer
quick sand with 1200grit
2 coats of grey primer
quick sand with 1200grit
the 3 coats of satin black

Image
Image


another qick sand with 1200grit
then 3 coats of lacquer..
Image
Image

then refit parts back onto car
Image
Image
Image


next up... fit some cream leather xjs seats (ebay purchase.. £46)
replace upper radius arm bushes
replace rear wheel bearing (not looking forward to this one.. :shock: )
drill out 2 sheared rear axle cover bolts.
replace rear axle cover gasket.
refurbish the chrome trim and wing mirrors.... have decided that i either paint the trim satin black or get completely new trim. after taking some of the old black paint off the trim, i've noticed the chrome underneath will never come up shiney again due to previous scoring/sanding work.


cheers,
Frank

Se6a GTE Auto 3702
'88 Saab 900 Turbo S

User avatar
Littlechicken
RSSOC Member
Posts: 437
Joined: Wed Oct 17, 2007 10:59 pm
Location: Birmingham
Been thanked: 1 time

Post by Littlechicken » Sun Oct 18, 2009 8:06 pm

Looking good :D



User avatar
philhoward
RSSOC Member
Posts: 25273
Joined: Tue Aug 29, 2006 5:41 pm
Location: Staffs, UK
Has thanked: 64 times
Been thanked: 632 times
Contact:

Post by philhoward » Sun Oct 18, 2009 10:19 pm

As for the wheel bearing - the "pipe flange trick" is your friend


Phil Howard
Scimitarweb Forum Admin
SS1 1600 Rooster Turbo; Sabre Mk1.5, Sabre Mk2
Previous: SE5/5a/SS1 No.1/SS1 Rooster/SS1 1800Ti/SE5a 24 Valve
http://www.ss1turbo.com
Never try and argue with an idiot. They drag you down to their level, then beat you based on experience.

User avatar
franko14
Posts: 726
Joined: Sun Aug 16, 2009 1:14 pm
Location: Scotland/Brazil
Been thanked: 2 times

Post by franko14 » Sun Oct 18, 2009 10:45 pm

ye phil, i've studied the previous posts on wheel bearing (rear) replacement. i think the best option for me will be to remove the half shaft and take it to an engineering workshop to have the hub pulled and the bearings pressed. only one problem with that... i've never done a job like that before and don't know exactly how to do it. But since i don't have a garage and the fact we are moving into winter now, i think its a better option than flapping about trying to pull the hub off in the rain :(

i'm not sure what replacement parts i'll need either (other than the actual bearings) :?: do i need to replace the oil seals :?:

i'm reluctant to pull the axle apart before knowing what i'm going to have to do to it, due to weather, time restraints etc.. any advice greatly received :D


cheers,
Frank

Se6a GTE Auto 3702
'88 Saab 900 Turbo S

User avatar
philhoward
RSSOC Member
Posts: 25273
Joined: Tue Aug 29, 2006 5:41 pm
Location: Staffs, UK
Has thanked: 64 times
Been thanked: 632 times
Contact:

Post by philhoward » Sun Oct 18, 2009 10:52 pm

I think it would be false economy not to replace the seals - sods law dictates the the seal will complain about being disturbed very shortly after reassembly if you don't..

It seems everyone who's used the pipe flange (Burtle being the most recent, i think) has had a 100% success rate with removing the hub but it might be prevalent to have a friendly engineering firm/blacksmith on standby just in case.


Phil Howard
Scimitarweb Forum Admin
SS1 1600 Rooster Turbo; Sabre Mk1.5, Sabre Mk2
Previous: SE5/5a/SS1 No.1/SS1 Rooster/SS1 1800Ti/SE5a 24 Valve
http://www.ss1turbo.com
Never try and argue with an idiot. They drag you down to their level, then beat you based on experience.

Post Reply

Return to “Project Progress”