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Engine Rebuild Novice

Posted: Thu Mar 07, 2019 11:00 am
by IanC
Hi,
I'm about to undertake the rebuild of an Essex engine from a kit of newly machined parts. I've never done a whole one before, just head swaps, bore honing , re-rings.
Anyway the question is - do I need to use a specialized assembly grease to prevent the engine running 'dry' before the oil circulates, or just oil all the bearings etc as advised in the RSSOC workshop manual?
Thanks in advance, Ian

Engine Rebuild Novice

Posted: Thu Mar 07, 2019 11:12 am
by b.c.flat hat
Hi Ian. Not really cos when the thing has heads on, oil filter, sump filled and gauge piped temporarily yer can whizz the oil pump drive down the dizzy hole wi' battery drill to prime and pressurise the lub circuit. Good init?

Engine Rebuild Novice

Posted: Thu Mar 07, 2019 11:20 am
by Tinker man
good morning,

personally i have always used a cam lube (sort of grease based lube) on cams and new bearings and a home brew of engine oil and STP (blue one) for other touching surfaces.. but not sure its totally necessary, i feel better knowing that when the engine turns (under its own power or not) there are no bare surfaces touching. also handy to do if the engine is going to be left standing for a while before installation and use. then run up the oil pump as described before firing.

just my two pence worth and i am not, repeat not, a professional engine builder so ignore me if you so desire and no offence taken.

thanks, Ian.

Engine Rebuild Novice

Posted: Thu Mar 07, 2019 11:30 am
by peter freeman
Alan Dean advised me to use this stuff when putting a engine together - I have no reason to think it is not advisable.

Engine Rebuild Novice

Posted: Thu Mar 07, 2019 12:11 pm
by IanC
Right, thanks a lot guys, it seems the belt and braces is to use some form of assembly lube, then spin the oil pump drive before starting up proper. I was going to turn the engine over with no spark untill i got a reading on the oil pressure gauge, but the 'drill down the distributor hole' idea is a cracker!
Thanks again, Ian

Engine Rebuild Novice

Posted: Thu Mar 07, 2019 1:03 pm
by Alan SS1
IanC wrote:
Thu Mar 07, 2019 12:11 pm
Right, thanks a lot guys, it seems the belt and braces is to use some form of assembly lube, then spin the oil pump drive before starting up proper. I was going to turn the engine over with no spark untill i got a reading on the oil pressure gauge, but the 'drill down the distributor hole' idea is a cracker!
Thanks again, Ian
did the same with the 480 when started from a LONG lay-up, advantage there was easy access to oil pump on front of engine, and when oil was fully around the engine the load on the drill changed giving a warm-fuzzy feeling (in addition to checking it was pouring over the cam shaft etc)

Engine Rebuild Novice

Posted: Sat Mar 09, 2019 10:17 am
by reliant-reviver
For assembly I use graphogen. Sure there are modern alternatives but can't go far wrong with it and a little goes a long way.

http://www.graphogen.co.uk/index.asp?pageid=644920

Engine Rebuild Novice

Posted: Sat Mar 09, 2019 10:41 am
by gtcse8
Ian if the Camshaft has had any work/grinding done it`s essential to blather all of it and the followers in CAM LUBE/CAM BEDDING IN OIL. :idea:
There are a few brands out there and IF you got a regrind they SHOULD have given you a tube or bottle. :!:
Don`t use normal engine oil as its been shown to NOT provide enough lubrication on newly ground surfaces. :cry:
Cam lube is high in Zinc and Phosphorous, both of which are able to take high loads and heat. :wink:
Do your research on the running in procedures BEFORE putting anything back together as certain oils and grease WILL need putting on surfaces AS YOU ASSEMBLE THEM. :idea:
DON`T just assemble, fill with oil, and then prime everything with the oil pump spinning tip as the oil will not get to certain areas immediately, just like the water in the cooling system there will be air pockets. :w

I have built loads of engines over the years and the ONLY failure I have had to deal with was due to the monkeys who installed the engine dropped it, split the sump, didn`t notice the river of oil going into the pit, and wondered why the engine made a lot of noise when running it at 2500 rpm as recommended. :bh

Good luck, Mark

Engine Rebuild Novice

Posted: Sat Mar 09, 2019 11:24 am
by TrevorG
I've always used graphogen on the race bikes as well......especially useful if you plan to leave an engine out for a couple of months. Love the oil pump drill trick on the Essex though....Will use this on mine.

Engine Rebuild Novice

Posted: Sat Mar 09, 2019 2:54 pm
by Nigel Clark
Breaking in the new cam is always the most critical part of a new engine's first start. Different cam suppliers have different advice about assembly lube. Most say run the engine 20 minutes at 2000rpm as soon as it starts, to break in the new cam and followers. Ask your supplier about lube and start up procedure, then follow his guidelines to the letter.

Using a drill down the distributor hole to build oil pressure is definitely a smart move.

Nigel

Engine Rebuild Novice

Posted: Sat Mar 09, 2019 3:40 pm
by IanC
Thanks guys for the further info. The full story on the 'kit of parts' saga is that the engine that came with the car had seized due to oil pump failure ( not the drive shaft). The crank has been machined and the 'kit' includes new 010" b/e and 020" mains shells (and +030" rings for the oversize pistons). However I've not got the block yet (due to arrive next week), but in a photo I can see it's got a steel timing wheel attached, so I'm guessing the cam hasn't been touched.Having said that, it would seem that from the above advice it wouldn't do any harm to lube up the cam/followers to protect them on start up. Here's hoping the cam's OK!
Thanks again, Ian

Engine Rebuild Novice

Posted: Sat Mar 09, 2019 4:33 pm
by David Tew
IanC wrote:
Sat Mar 09, 2019 3:40 pm
it wouldn't do any harm to lube up the cam/followers to protect them on start up
This is what I use. IMHO if it's supplied by the cam manufacturer it must be OK. You'll get 250ml (plenty for a few cams) for £10-£11 delivered online.
Kent cam_lube.jpg
Kent cam_lube.jpg (44.45 KiB) Viewed 2204 times

Engine Rebuild Novice

Posted: Sat Mar 09, 2019 5:05 pm
by efi_sprintgte
Cam and followers aside, engine oil is OK as long as the engine is built and run. An assembly lube stays much better so for engines that are built and then stored it is a much better option. Torco, Millers and many others make it and it does not cost a lot... worth it IMHO.

Engine Rebuild Novice

Posted: Sat Mar 09, 2019 5:33 pm
by IanC
Thanks for the tips. The plan is to get the engine fixed, in and running asap!
Its recipient is pretty smart, so I'm really looking forward to getting it mobile.

Engine Rebuild Novice

Posted: Sat Mar 09, 2019 7:40 pm
by Diyhell
Lovely looking car!