Brake fluid tester recommendation wanted

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Jimscim
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Brake fluid tester recommendation wanted

Post by Jimscim » Thu Jul 19, 2018 4:52 pm

I used to sell the Alba tester . It was very accurate and it was calibrated with certificate . It cost circa £ 200 .


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Brake fluid tester recommendation wanted

Post by Jimscim » Thu Jul 19, 2018 7:22 pm

drcdb15 wrote:
Sun Jul 15, 2018 1:20 pm
Laters wrote:
Sun Jul 15, 2018 12:17 pm
Reason he bought that one is it was the cheapest of the ones he could find on ebay that included the battery. :roll:
Ah, a man after my own heart :lol:
Jimscim wrote:
Sun Jul 15, 2018 1:01 pm
It’s only garages that need a Brake Fluid Tester . ... the Tester is just a selling tool .
By, you're a hard man, Jim - would you deny an old fart his little gadgetry pleasures ? :lol:
No I certainly would not :)sorry if I gave that impression, I am as guilty as you on gadgetry pleasures :wink:



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Brake fluid tester recommendation wanted

Post by td99 » Thu Jul 19, 2018 7:35 pm

Interesting read. I think it's easier and cheaper to just replace brake fluid every so many years. Was thinking today the brakes were not as sharp as some time ago so that could be a reason.
So how do you know that you've flushed the old fluid out and know when the new is flowing though the bleed nipple?
Calculate the volume of each brake tube I guess, after emptying and refilling the reservoir and master cyl?
Is there a colorant one could add to the "old" fluid before refreshing?


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Brake fluid tester recommendation wanted

Post by Old and Slow » Thu Jul 19, 2018 8:42 pm

Anyone with lots of time on their hands?
Here's an idea:
If you add water in 1% increments (by volume) to a sample of new fluid you should be able to calibrate your meter easily. I'd do it in a plastic (non-conductive) container first, and then repeat each step in a metal container as there will be a conduction path via a metal container which I'd expect will give you a higher reading. This should help to avoid misleading high readings if you have an old-style metal brake fluid reservoir.
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Brake fluid tester recommendation wanted

Post by drcdb15 » Sat Jul 21, 2018 5:15 pm

td99 wrote:
Thu Jul 19, 2018 7:35 pm
Interesting read. I think it's easier and cheaper to just replace brake fluid every so many years. Was thinking today the brakes were not as sharp as some time ago so that could be a reason.
So how do you know that you've flushed the old fluid out and know when the new is flowing though the bleed nipple?
Calculate the volume of each brake tube I guess, after emptying and refilling the reservoir and master cyl?
Is there a colorant one could add to the "old" fluid before refreshing?
This is quite easy if you can't see any change in colour, and assuming you've got a rubbish £4 tester off eBay ( :lol: ) because you don't actually need to know what the water content is, you just need to know when the water content is 'as new' or 'still old stuff', pass or fail.

So, if you're changing the fluid we can assume you have fresh fluid to put in. We can also assume the new stuff is good, inasfar as the water content is negligible. So you can stick the tester in it, and get a reading - typically the green LED light.

If you now take a sample of the old grotty fluid, you can stick the tester in that and get a reading - let's assume it's a blaring red change it NOW!!! warning light. (If it's NOT the red warning, then it does suggest that maybe your old fluid is in fact better than you thought and maybe doesn't actually need changing just yet!).

So, all you need to do is to bleed the brakes into a clean jar, and test the fluid that's coming through from time to time. At first, with heavily old fluid, you should get the red light. As the new fluid arrives, you should get the green light.

Now obviously there will still be a trace of the old stuff mixed in with the new, as the old stuff will not clinically disappear from the inside surfaces of the pipes completely, but it doesn't matter if what's in the pipes is 95% new or 99.9999% new, as long as its water content is at least as low as the new fluid you're putting in. It's the water content of the fluid that's important, not its age (unless of course there are other negating factors such as corrosion in the system, although if there's "no" water, then there should be no corrosion either).


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Brake fluid tester recommendation wanted

Post by Laters » Sat Jul 21, 2018 6:26 pm

drcdb15 wrote:
Sat Jul 21, 2018 5:15 pm
This is quite easy if you can't see any change in colour, and assuming you've got a rubbish £4 tester off eBay ( :lol: ) because you don't actually need to know what the water content is, you just need to know when the water content is 'as new' or 'still old stuff', pass or fail.

So, if you're changing the fluid we can assume you have fresh fluid to put in. We can also assume the new stuff is good, inasfar as the water content is negligible. So you can stick the tester in it, and get a reading - typically the green LED light.

If you now take a sample of the old grotty fluid, you can stick the tester in that and get a reading - let's assume it's a blaring red change it NOW!!! warning light. (If it's NOT the red warning, then it does suggest that maybe your old fluid is in fact better than you thought and maybe doesn't actually need changing just yet!).

So, all you need to do is to bleed the brakes into a clean jar, and test the fluid that's coming through from time to time. At first, with heavily old fluid, you should get the red light. As the new fluid arrives, you should get the green light.
That's the method I use when I change the fluid if the old & new are the same colour.


Paul

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Currently owned:- 1976 se6 automatic

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