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Engine Rebuild Novice

Posted: Mon Apr 08, 2019 3:06 pm
by Nick
Taken 2 engines out this way!

Engine Rebuild Novice

Posted: Mon Apr 08, 2019 3:38 pm
by Coupe Racing
I've don't it loads of times too

Engine Rebuild Novice

Posted: Mon Apr 08, 2019 3:45 pm
by IanC
Thanks guys, that's the way I'll do it then!
Ian

Engine Rebuild Novice

Posted: Mon Apr 08, 2019 3:54 pm
by philhoward
I think the official "tool" is basically two pieces of angle iron, back to back (probably welded but bolted will probably do), 4 holes for the carb mounting studs to go through and a single hole on the upright part for a hook off your crane/block and tackle. Shouldn't even need a leveller as it tilts to just about the perfect angle to go in the hole if the gearbox is attached, and stays about level to mate with the gearbox if it's still in the car.

Engine Rebuild Novice

Posted: Mon Apr 08, 2019 9:57 pm
by IanC
Thanks for the info. I'll check tomorrow, but i think the angled brackets on my engine leveller will fit back to back so as to fit on the carb mount. If they do, it'll be a neat solution.
Edit! Just checked, the load leveller angled brackets fit the carb bolts beautifully, so that's the way to go. Thanks Phil.

Engine Rebuild Novice

Posted: Wed Apr 17, 2019 6:59 pm
by IanC
All back together, so let's see if it actually goes! If it does, then it's brakes and dripping diff next, slightly more familiar territory for me.

Engine Rebuild Novice

Posted: Wed Apr 17, 2019 8:42 pm
by TrevorG
I put a few photos of the angle brackets holding engine and gearbox when I removed them on 'Removing engine and gearbox together', might help you in determining the angle achieved.

Engine Rebuild Novice

Posted: Sat Apr 20, 2019 2:28 pm
by IanC
Not going smoothly. I thought the brakes would be fairly straightforward until this (photo) happened. I can see I've got a bit to do in order to replace it, but is this a specialist part or common to other cars?

Engine Rebuild Novice

Posted: Sat Apr 20, 2019 4:04 pm
by scimjim
1/2” UNF but I can’t remember how long standard studs are - GW/QRG/Mark Wilson may stock them?

Engine Rebuild Novice

Posted: Sat Apr 20, 2019 4:23 pm
by IanC
Thanks Jim, I'll try there.

Engine Rebuild Novice

Posted: Sat Apr 20, 2019 6:20 pm
by gtcse8
Ian I have a few front studs spare, the hub will have to come off, and sometimes the disc to get to the head of the stud to knock it back in, or sometimes you can pull it back in with the wheel nut and and a spacer.
Mark

Engine Rebuild Novice

Posted: Mon Apr 22, 2019 1:44 pm
by IanC
Sump gasket woes - I fitted a gasket which a) was thick and b) had black specks in it, I'm guessing it was a rubber impregnated type mentioned by gtcse8 above. I torqued up the bolts to the recommended 6-8lb/ft and noticed that the gasket had splayed out at the rear. I redid the whole operation and this time the gasket popped out by quite a lot, at one side.
Fortunately I had another Payen, cork gasket which went on beautifully - but I haven't yet torqued it up. What do the sages think - just do it up by feel , or beg borrow steal or even buy a low range torque wrench?

Engine Rebuild Novice

Posted: Mon Apr 22, 2019 1:53 pm
by gtcse8
Do it by feel Ian
You WILL have to tighten it all up again and again and again :!:
Unless you use a flexible sealant such as Sikasil RTV oil resistant fluid gasket.
Modern engines use the very minimum of "Thick" gasket as modern manufacturing tolerances can achieve better mating surfaces.
But where pressed steel parts meet machined faces they use a Room temp vulcanising Goo to get the seal. :W

Engine Rebuild Novice

Posted: Mon Apr 22, 2019 2:36 pm
by IanC
Many thanks Mark, that kind of advice/info is invaluable!

Engine Rebuild Novice

Posted: Mon Apr 22, 2019 7:26 pm
by Old and Slow
If you wanted to "stick" with the thick gasket, you could coat the sump face with RTV and put the gasket on it until it has set. It should then hold the gasket in place and that way it shouldn't bulge out